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3975 5th Ave Hillcrest, San Diego

Services

 

Chiropractic Care

Chiropractic is a profession that specializes in nerve, muscle, and joint function. Chiropractors use different techniques to manipulate the spine and extremities to provide appropriate movement in the joints so they function optimally. Chiropractic care can not only alleviate pain, but also support the body’s natural ability to heal itself and function properly, and even enhance performance for athletes of all levels. Common injuries treated with chiropractic care include, but are not limited to: muscle strain, joint sprain, disc bulge, disc herniation, post-surgery, athletic injuries, whiplash injuries, neck/back pain, and sciatica.

Chiropractors here at The Center for Corrective Exercise not only perform manipulation, but also utilize muscle and soft tissue techniques to ensure the surrounding muscles are relaxed and moving appropriately. With this model, your visit will not be a quick “in-and-out” visit; instead, you will spend ample time with your provider receiving muscle work prior to any manipulation. Your provider will determine if manipulation is appropriate for your injury, and if so, which technique is most appropriate.

Upon your initial visit at The Center for Corrective Exercise, your chiropractor will perform a thorough history and examination, discuss findings of the exam, discuss treatment recommendations, and perform recommended treatments. Based on your particular injury, treatments may, or may not, include the following: joint manipulation, soft tissue muscle work, electrical muscle stimulation, deep muscle stimulation, moist heat/ice, and ultrasound therapy. Your provider may also discuss and/or demonstrate home care instructions, including exercises, heat/ice, foam rolling, and stretching.

 

Advanced Movement Therapy

 

Advanced Movement Therapy is a modality of bodywork which incorporates soft-tissue manipulation through the use of a “Pin and Stretch” technique often used by massage therapists. The premise is to “pin” a muscle in position and then “stretch” the muscle tissue. This is accomplished by way of shortening the muscle, offering the muscle a resistant force “pinning”, and then lengthening “stretching” the muscle. The primary goal of this type of bodywork is to increase range of motion while the secondary goal is the reduction of pain.

 

Advanced Movement Therapy is designed to assist those clients/patients undergoing rehabilitation. The best results occur when it is coupled with a Corrective Exercise program designed specifically to address a previously identified condition such as upper/lower crossed syndrome, TMJ disorder, carpal tunnel syndrome, hyperlordosis, knee valgus (knees caved inwardly), pes planus (flat feet), vertebral disc compression/bulge/herniation, or any number of other soft-tissue ailments or muscular imbalances. Although no condition need be present to utilize Advanced Movement Therapy, the benefits are immeasurable for those clients/patients who suffer with such a condition. Discretion should be used on the part of the massage practitioner as Advanced Movement Therapy is not a cure-all.

 

Advanced Movement Therapy consists of three phases.

The first phase is the Warming Phase. During the warming phase, the client remains in a position to receive general massage work. This phase can vary in duration and depth. The primary goal of this phase is to warm the tissue and increase fluid circulation in the muscle to be addressed. Secondary goals of this phase include assessing the following: tissue quality, pain, muscle adhesion, and structural abnormalities. The duration to which this phase will last will be determined by the practitioner. This phase should be very familiar to the massage practitioner as it is akin to Swedish massage with the only variation being that strokes are NOT required to be centripetal.

 

The second phase is the Passive Movement Phase. During the passive movement phase the client/patient passively receives the work while the practitioner moves the target muscle through a series of movements. The primary goal of this phase is to take the target muscle through its full range of motion while palpating for structural abnormalities during passive movement. Secondary goals of this phase include further assessing the following: tissue quality, pain during passive motion, muscle adhesions, and limits in range of motion. The duration to which this phase will last will be determined by the practitioner. It is recommended to use a minimum of 10-15 strokes in order to adequately prepare tissue for the following phase.

 

The third phase is the Active Movement Phase. During the active movement phase the client/patient actively moves the target muscle through a series of movements while the practitioner offers resistive force to the target muscle. In this phase, the movement comes in the form of the client/patient shortening and then lengthening the muscle under the direction of the practitioner.  The primary goal of this phase is to get the client/patient to move the target muscle through its full range of motion while offering resistance to the entire length of the muscle in an effort to stretch the muscle while it is in motion. The important thing to note in this phase is the gliding of the resistive force. The resistive force may come in the form of a finger(s), hand, elbow, forearm, or other apparatus so long as the entire length of the muscle can receive a resistive force during the movement. Secondary goals of this phase include further assessing tissue quality, assessing pain during active motion, palpating for muscle adhesions, noting limits in range of motion, and again determining any structural abnormalities which may adversely affect movement. The duration to which this phase will last will be determined by the practitioner. It is recommended to use a minimum of 10-20 strokes in this phase in an effort to stretch the muscle.

Corrective Exercise

 

The easiest way to describe and understand Corrective Exercise is to first understand what is a postural distortion. Think of a postural distortion as something that is wrong with a person’s posture. When you see someone who has a hunchback, walks with their feet turned out like a duck ,or “knock-knees” - these are examples of postural distortions. Corrective Exercise is a process in which the provider identifies these postural distortions and then creates an exercise program to correct them.

Deep Muscle Stimulation

 

The Deep Muscle Stimulator (DMS) is a handheld device that is placed on the area to be treated and provides deep muscle tissues with percussion and vibration. Common injuries treated with DMS include muscle spasm, pain, inflammation, muscle strain, and scar tissue. It can also be used to enhance athletic performance prior to an event, and decrease post-performance cramping and fatigue. Unlike some other forms of therapy, the DMS can be used immediately prior to, and following, a performance.

Upon your initial visit, your provider will determine if deep muscle stimulation is an appropriate treatment option for your injury and/or training program. Deep muscle stimulation is typically performed in conjunction with other courses of care; however, in some cases, it is offered as a stand alone treatment.

 

Electrical Muscle Stimulation

Electrical Muscle Stimulation is a form of treatment where electrical currents are applied to the muscles for a therapeutic outcome.  Depending on the setting, the electrical stimulation will affect the body in different ways.  Some of the most common therapeutic outcomes include: stimulating nerves to decrease pain, stimulating muscles to contract, and increasing blood flow to increase healing and decrease inflammation. Some of the most common injuries treated with electrical muscle stimulation include muscle spasm, muscle atrophy, joint sprain, muscle strain, tendonitis, inflammation, and disc injury.

Upon your initial visit with the chiropractor, your provider will determine if Electrical Muscle Stimulation is an appropriate treatment option for your injury.  Electrical Muscle Stimulation is typically performed in conjunction with other courses of care; however, in some cases, it is offered as a stand alone treatment.
 

 

Ultrasound Therapy

 

Therapeutic ultrasound is one of the treatment options offered at The Center for Corrective Exercise.  Ultrasound therapy uses a handheld device placed against the skin to send sound waves into the deep tissues.  This causes the deep tissues to vibrate and heat up from the inside out, increasing blood supply to the injured area and speeding up recovery. Ultrasound therapy has many uses including muscle spasm, joint sprain, muscle strain, tendonitis, inflammation, disc injury, and scar tissue repair, to name a few.

 

Upon your initial visit with the chiropractor, your provider will determine if ultrasound therapy is an appropriate treatment option for your injury.  Ultrasound therapy is typically performed in conjunction with other courses of care; however, in some cases, it is offered as a stand alone treatment.
 

 

Kinesiotaping

Kinesiotaping is a taping technique using a flexible and stretchable tape that provides support and stability, without restricting the body’s range of motion.  This allows the body to function optimally and heal while also being supported, which is especially beneficial to allow for continued performance in work and athletics.  This type of technique can be used to support muscle and joints both proactively while performing in activities, as well as when injured. It is commonly used for sprains, torn muscles, joint instability, irregular joint movements, scoliosis, and to decrease swelling and pain, among many other injuries.

Upon your initial visit with the chiropractor, your provider will determine if kinesiotaping is an appropriate treatment option for your injury.  Kinesiotaping is typically performed in conjunction with other courses of care; however, in some cases, it is offered as a stand alone treatment.

 

Cryotherapy

 

Cryotherapy, simply put, means any type of therapy which includes the use of cold temperatures, like the application of ice, to help an injured area to heal. At CCE the way we use cryotherapy is by the application of form-fitted ice packs which are designed for specific areas of the body. For example, when a patient has an injured elbow, we have an ice pack which is designed to fit the contour of the elbow. Our form-fitting ice packs don’t rely on frozen water to retain their cold temperatures. Due to the proprietor formula in our ice packs, they can remain cold for hours and they don’t melt or condensate all over you or your clothes.